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Microsoft Word Training

websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 16:07

Microsoft Word is a word processing system that can be utilized for both business and personal use. While already feature rich and critical for productivity, Microsoft continues to improve and enhance Word with each new release.

Microsoft Word training at New Horizons will help you develop or improve your Microsoft Word skills so that you are able to make the most of this industry standard application. All of our Microsoft Word classes are taught by Microsoft Certified Trainers.

MICROSOFT WORD COURSES WILL COVER:

  • Newest features of Word
  • Document creation, editing, and saving
  • Formatting text and paragraphs
  • Working with tables, columns, and other formatting features
  • Graphics, WordArt, charts, and text flow
  • Document templates
  • Advanced features including mail merge, macros, document versioning, and proofing tools

 

MICROSOFT WORD CERTIFICATION

Your Microsoft Word training will prepare you for a Microsoft Office Specialist certification. Check out more details here:

Microsoft Office Certification proves that you have core to advanced skills in Microsoft Office applications. Certification is helpful for those new to the workforce or transitioning to a more analytical role, since it proves you can perform tasks at a higher level. This gives you a leg up against competing candidates.

Publisher Training

websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 16:05

Microsoft Publisher is a desktop publishing application that places emphasis on page layout and design. It lets you create visually rich, professionally-looking publications, including flyers, posters, product catalogs, and email newsletters.

When you or your team effectively utilize Microsoft Publisher, then you save on graphic design costs and have more control over the presentation of your personal message.

New Horizons offers Publishing training to help get you started on using Microsoft Publisher's intuitive, easy-to-use software. Whether you are new to Microsoft Publisher or looking to learn new tips and tricks, we have you covered.

All of our Microsoft Publisher courses are taught by Microsoft Certified trainers.

In New Horizons Publisher courses you will learn about:

  • Working with basic publications
  • Editing and formatting publications
  • Working with pictures and graphics
  • Preparing a publication for distribution

 

    Microsoft Project Training

    websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 16:04

    Microsoft Project is a project management software program designed to assist managers so they can achieve a successful outcome and the benefits of Project software grow with each new edition. Microsoft Project training from New Horizons will help you stay abreast of the latest changes, whether it be for personal use, or to train your employees for an upgrade in your organization. Microsoft Project training from New Horizons can help project managers assign resources to tasks, track progress, manage a budget and analyze workloads.

    With Microsoft Project, managers are easily able to analyze resources, check budgets, evaluate timelines, measure progress, and anticipate resource needs. In addition to assisting project managers, Microsoft Project also enables team members to manage tasks, collaborate, submit time sheets, and flag issues and risks. Moreover, it helps executives to define business drivers, measure strategic impact of competing ideas, make funding decisions, and view project and resources status.:

    PROJECT COURSE TOPICS

    • Creating a project plan
    • Managing and configuring tasks in Project
    • Understanding and managing resources
    • Integrating data with other Microsoft applications
    • Tracking costs
    • Viewing project information visually

     

      PowerPoint Training

      websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 16:03

      Microsoft PowerPoint is powerful software that allows you to create captivating slide presentations that can easily be shared on the web. If you want to present any information creatively and professionally, then Microsoft PowerPoint is the perfect tool.

      New Horizons has courses to help you learn how to use Microsoft PowerPoint and get started on creating memorable PowerPoint presentations. All of New Horizons' Microsoft PowerPoint classes are taught by Microsoft Certified Trainers.

      MICROSOFT POWERPOINT COURSE TOPICS

      • New Features of PowerPoint
      • Creating presentations with PowerPoint
      • Formatting and organizing PowerPoint slides
      • Working with graphics, tables and charts
      • Adding multimedia and SmartArt presentations
      • Integrating with Microsoft Office files

       

      MICROSOFT POWERPOINT CERTIFICATION

      Your Microsoft PowerPoint training will prepare you for a Microsoft Office Specialist certification. Check out more details here:

      Microsoft Office Certification proves that you have core to advanced skills in Microsoft Office applications. Certification is helpful for those new to the workforce or transitioning to a more analytical role, since it proves you can perform tasks at a higher level. This gives you a leg up against competing candidates.

      Outlook Training

      websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 16:03

      New Horizons offers world-class training for several versions of Microsoft Office including 2016, 2013, 2010 and earlier. All our courses are delivered by one of our Microsoft Certified Trainers ready to help you or your employees get the most out of Outlook.

      Microsoft Outlook courses at New Horizons will teach you how to:

      • Use features of Outlook
      • Compose and organize your email
      • Working with contacts
      • Use calendar features
      • Do Outlook tasks

       

      OUTLOOK CERTIFICATION

      Your Outlook training will help prepare you for Microsoft Office Specialist certification. This certification is helpful if you are new to the job market, or looking to get ahead in your current position. Check out more details here:

      Microsoft Office Certification proves that you have core to advanced skills in Microsoft Office applications. Certification is helpful for those new to the workforce or transitioning to a more analytical role, since it proves you can perform tasks at a higher level. This gives you a leg up against competing candidates.

      OneNote Training

      websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 16:02

      Microsoft OneNote lets you create and store notes in a convenient location, enabling you to find and use them simply. The organizational power of OneNote is essential to maintaining productivity. 

      New Horizons offers world-class OneNote training and all courses are delivered by one of our Microsoft Certified Trainers. Whether you're new to OneNote or an advanced user, our training will cover all you need to know to become an OneNote power user.

      MICROSOFT ONENOTE COURSES WILL COVER:

      • The Microsoft OneNote interface
      • How to create a simple notebook
      • How to create notes
      • How to organize content and search for information in a OneNote notebook
      • Integration of OneNote with other applications
      • Using OneNote to share notes with other people

       

        Visio Training

        websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 16:01

        Microsoft Visio is an intelligent diagramming and vector graphics application. Visio helps simplify information communication with data-driven visual information including, but not limited to:

        • Organization charts
        • Network diagrams
        • Business processes

        Visio makes it easy to share this information on the Web and in real-time. Its professional templates are also easily integrated with other Microsoft Office products, such as Office and Excel.

        BENEFITS OF VISIO TRAINING FROM NEW HORIZONS

        Whether you are new to Visio or an advanced user looking for tips and tricks, New Horizons has the courses you need. All of our Microsoft Visio trainers are Microsoft Certified and are ready to help teach you all that you need to know to become a Microsoft Visio pro.

        New Horizons Visio courses cover:

        • Working with basic diagrams and shapes
        • Creating an organization chart
        • Creating shapes, design styles, templates, and stencils
        • Working with layers
        • Sharing and collaboration features

         

          Excel Training

          websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 14:21

          Microsoft Excel is the most commonly used spreadsheet application. Learning how to use Excel is an investment in both your personal and professional life. Excel makes it easy to monitor financial performance, such as business profit or loss, calculate payments on large purchases, plan a budget, or stay organized with checklists.

          As an employee, learning how to use Excel efficiently provides value, since most jobs utilize this application. This opens up more opportunities for employment and career advancement.

          When employees know how to use Excel, it improves their efficiency in the workplace. Employees who know how to create detailed worksheets, invoices, charts, and complex formulas achieve professional results in a fraction of the time.

          Excel training at New Horizons includes basic to advanced courses. Whether you're brand new to Excel or seeking advanced knowledge, we've got it covered. Get Started Today!

          MICROSOFT OFFICE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATION

          Excel training at New Horizons will help prepare you for a Microsoft Office Specialist Certification (MOS) Excel Certification. Check out more details here:

          Microsoft Office Certification proves that you have core to advanced skills in Microsoft Office applications. Certification is helpful for those new to the workforce or transitioning to a more analytical role, since it proves you can perform tasks at a higher level. This gives you a leg up against competing candidates.

          Holding a MOS certification can earn an entry-level business employee as much as $16,000 more in annual salary than uncertified peers.*

          ACCESS TRAINING

          websitedeveloper - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 14:20

          Take control of your data with Microsoft Access relational database software training at New Horizons. Our courses will teach you basic to advanced features of Access.

          Whether you are new to Access or an advanced user, this training will cover what you need to know as efficiently as possible. New Horizons offers world-class training for several versions, including 2016, 2013, 2010, 2007 and earlier. And, of course, all classes are delivered by one of our Microsoft Certified Trainers.

          Microsoft Access courses at New Horizons will teach you how to:

          • Create and design Access databases
          • Work with Access tables, relationships, keys and constraints
          • Query data
          • Manage and design interfaces with Access Forms
          • Create basic to advanced reports
          • Automate tasks with Macros and VBA

           

          Microsoft Office Specialist Certification

          Access training at New Horizons will help prepare you for a Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Access Certification. Check out more details here:

          Microsoft Office Certification proves that you have core to advanced skills in Microsoft Office applications. Certification is helpful for those new to the workforce or transitioning to a more analytical role, since it proves you can perform tasks at a higher level. This gives you a leg up against competing candidates.

          Wilkinson and Reinsch Handbook on Linear Algebra

          latest Blogs - Tue, 12/05/2017 - 05:00

          The ACM Special Interest Group on Programming Languages, SIGPLAN, expects to hold the fourth in a series of conferences on the History of Programming Languages in 2020, see HOPL-IV. The first drafts of papers are to be submitted by August, 2018. That long lead time gives me the opportunity to write a detailed history of MATLAB. I plan to write the paper in sections, which I'll post in this blog as they are available.

          The mathematical basis for the first version of MATLAB begins with a volume edited by J. H. Wilkinson and C. Reinsch, Handbook for Automatic Computation, Volume II, Linear Algebra, published by the eminent German publisher Springer-Verlag, in 1971.

          ContentsEigenvalues

          The mathematical term "eigenvalue" is a linguistic hybrid. In German the term is "eigenwert". One Web dictionary says the English translation is "intrinsic value". But after a few decades using terms like "characteristic value" and "latent root", mathematicians have given up trying to translate the entire word and generally translate only the second half.

          The eigenvalue problem for a given matrix $A$ is the task of finding scalars $\lambda$ and, possibly, the corresponding vectors $x$ so that

          $$Ax = \lambda x$$

          It is important to distinguish the case where $A$ is symmetric. After the linear equation problem,

          $$Ax = b$$

          the eigenvalue problem is the most important computational task in numerical linear algebra.

          The state of the art in numerical linear algebra 50 years ago, in the 1960's, did not yet provide reliable, efficient methods for solving matrix eigenvalue problems. Software libraries had a hodgepodge of methods, many of them based upon polynomial root finders.

          Jim Wilkinson told a story about having two such subroutines, one using something called Bairstow's method and one using something called Laguerre's method. He couldn't decide which one was best, so he put them together in a program that first tried Bairstow's method, then printed a message and switched to Laguerre if Bairstow failed. After several months of frequent use at the National Physical Laboratory, he never saw a case where Bairstow failed. He wrote a paper with his recommendation for Bairstow's method and soon got a letter from a reader who claimed to have an example which Bairstow could not handle. Wilkinson tried the example with his program and found a bug. The program didn't print the message that it was switching to Laguerre.

          Handbook for Automatic Computation

          Over the period 1965-1970, Wilkinson and 18 of his colleagues published a series of papers in the Springer journal Numerische Mathematik. The papers offered procedures, written in Algol 60, for solving different versions of the linear equation problem and the eigenvalue problem. These were research papers presenting results about numerical stability, subtle details of implementation, and, in some cases, new methods.

          In 1971, these papers were collected, sometimes with modifications, in the volume edited by Wilkinson and Reinsch. This book marks the first appearance is an organized library of the algorithms for the eigenvalue problem for dense, stored matrices that we still use in MATLAB today. The importance of using orthogonal transformations wherever possible was exposed by Wilkinson and the other authors. The effectiveness of the newly discovered QR algorithms of J. Francis and the related LR algorithm of H. Rutishauser had only recently been appreciated.

          Contents

          The Algol 60 procedures are the focus of each chapter. These codes remain a clear, readable reference for the important ideas of modern numerical linear algebra. Part I of the volume is about the linear equation problem; part II is about the eigenvalue problem. There are 40 procedures in part I and 43 in part II.

          Here is a list of the procedures in Part II. A suffix 2 in the procedure name indicates that it computes both eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The "bak" procedures apply reduction transformations to eigenvectors.

          Many of the procedures work with a reduced form, which is tridiagonal for symmetric or Hermitian matrices and Hessenberg (upper triangular plus one subdiagonal) for nonsymmetric matrices., Since Algol does not have a complex number data type, the complex arrays are represented by pairs of real arrays.

          Symmetric matrices

          Reduction to tridiagonal tred1, tred2, tred3, trbak1, trbak3 Orthogonal tridiagonalization. Band bandrd Tridiagonalization. symray Eigenvectors. bqr One eigenvalue. Tridiagonal imtql1,imtql2 All eigenvalues and vectors, implicit QR. tql1, tql2 All eigenvalues and vectors, explicit QR. ratqr Few eigenvalues, rational QR. bisect Few eigenvalues, bisection. tristurm Few eigenvalues and vectors. Few eigenvalues ritzit Simultaneous iteration. Jacobi method jacobi Jacobi method. Generalized problem, Ax = \lambda Bx reduc1, reduc2, rebaka, rebakb Symmetric A, positive definite B.

          Nonsymmetric matrices

          Reduction to Hessenberg balance, balbak Balance (scaling) dirhes, dirbak, dirtrans Elementary, accumulated innerprod. elmhes, elmbak, elmtrans Elementary. orthes, ortbak, ortrans Orthogonal. Band unsray Eigenvectors. Hessenberg hqr, hqr2 All eigenvalues and vectors, implicit QR. invit Few eigenvectors, inverse iteration. Norm reducing eigen Eigenvalues.

          Complex matrices

          comeig Norm reducing Jacobi. comhes, combak Reduce to Hessenberg form. comlr, comlr2 Complex LR algorithm. cxinvit Inverse iteration.

          Preferred paths

          The preferred path for finding all the eigenvalues of a real, symmetric matrix is tred1 followed by imtql1. The preferred path for finding all the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a real, symmetric matrix is tred2 followed by imtql2.

          The preferred path for finding all the eigenvalues of a real, nonsymmetric matrix is balanc, elmhes, and finally hqr. The preferred path for finding all the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a real, nonsymmetric matrix is balanc, elmhes, elmtrans, hqr2, and finally balbak.

          QR vs. QL

          "QR" and "QL" are right- and left-handed, or forward and backward, versions of the same algorithm. The algorithm is usually described in terms of factoring a matrix into an orthogonal factor, Q, and an upper or right triangular factor, R. This leads to QR algorithms. But for reasons having to do with graded matrices and terminating a loop at 1 rather than n-1, the authors of the Handbook decided to use left triangular and QL algorithms.

          Historical note

          When the papers from Numerische Mathematik were collected to form the 1971 Handbook for Automatic Computation, Volume II, Linear Algebra, almost all of them where reprinted without change. But, despite what its footnote says, Contribution II/4, The Implicit QL Algorithm, never appeared in the journal. The paper is the merger of a half-page paper by Austin Dubrulle and earlier contributions by R.S. Martin and Wilkinson. Dubrulle was able to reduce the operation count in the inner loop.

          The authors of Contribution II/4 of the Handbook are listed as A. Dubrulle, R.S.Martin, and J.H.Wilkinson, although the three of them never actually worked together. Proper credit is given, but I'm afraid that an interesting little bit of history has been lost.

          Dubrulle's version of the implicit tridiagonal QR algorithm continues to be important today. In future posts I will describe how the Handbook led to EISPACK, LINPACK and LAPACK. In LAPACK the imtql1 and imtql2 functions are combined into one subroutine named DSTEQR.F The code for the inner loop is very similar to Austin's note.

          Years after making this contribution, Austin returned to grad school and was one of my Ph.D. students at the University of New Mexico. His thesis was about the distribution of the singular value of the matrices derived from photographs.

          \n'); d.write(code_string); // Add copyright line at the bottom if specified. if (copyright.length > 0) { d.writeln(''); d.writeln('%%'); if (copyright.length > 0) { d.writeln('% _' + copyright + '_'); } } d.write('\n'); d.title = title + ' (MATLAB code)'; d.close(); } -->


          Get the MATLAB code (requires JavaScript)

          Published with MATLAB® R2017a

          . The first drafts of % papers are to be submitted by August, 2018. That long lead time % gives me the opportunity to write a detailed history of MATLAB. % I plan to write the paper in sections, which I'll post in % this blog as they are available. % % The mathematical basis for the first version of MATLAB begins % with a volume edited by J. H. Wilkinson and C. Reinsch, % _Handbook for Automatic Computation, Volume II, Linear Algebra_, % published by the eminent German publisher Springer-Verlag, in 1971. % % <> %% Eigenvalues % The mathematical term "eigenvalue" is a linguistic hybrid. In German % the term is "eigenwert". One Web dictionary says the English translation % is "intrinsic value". But after a few decades using terms like % "characteristic value" and "latent root", mathematicians have given up % trying to translate the entire word and generally translate only the % second half. %% % The _eigenvalue problem_ for a given matrix $A$ is the task of finding % scalars $\lambda$ and, possibly, the corresponding vectors $x$ so that % % $$Ax = \lambda x$$ % % It is important to distinguish the case where $A$ is symmetric. % After the _linear equation problem_, % % $$Ax = b$$ % % the eigenvalue problem is the most important computational task % in numerical linear algebra. %% % The state of the art in numerical linear algebra 50 years ago, in the % 1960's, did not yet provide reliable, efficient methods for solving % matrix eigenvalue problems. Software libraries had a hodgepodge % of methods, many of them based upon polynomial root finders. %% % told a story about having two such subroutines, one using % something called Bairstow's method and one using something called % Laguerre's method. He couldn't decide which one was best, % so he put them together in a program that first tried % Bairstow's method, then printed a message and switched to Laguerre % if Bairstow failed. After several months of frequent use at the National % Physical Laboratory, he never saw a case where Bairstow failed. % He wrote a paper with his recommendation for Bairstow's method and % soon got a letter from a reader who claimed to have an example which % Bairstow could not handle. Wilkinson tried the example with his program % and found a bug. The program didn't print the message that it was % switching to Laguerre. %% Handbook for Automatic Computation % Over the period 1965-1970, Wilkinson and 18 of his colleagues % published a series of % papers in the Springer journal _Numerische Mathematik_. % The papers offered procedures, written in Algol 60, for solving different % versions of the linear equation problem and the eigenvalue problem. % These were _research_ papers presenting results about numerical stability, % subtle details of implementation, and, in some cases, new methods. %% % In 1971, these papers were collected, sometimes with modifications, % in the volume edited by Wilkinson and Reinsch. This book marks the % first appearance is an organized library of the algorithms for the % eigenvalue problem for dense, stored matrices that we still use in % MATLAB today. The importance of using orthogonal transformations % wherever possible was exposed by Wilkinson and the other authors. The % effectiveness of the newly discovered QR algorithms of J. Francis % and the related LR algorithm of H. Rutishauser had only recently been % appreciated. %% Contents % The Algol 60 procedures are the focus of each chapter. These codes % remain a clear, readable reference for the important ideas of modern % numerical linear algebra. Part I of the volume is about the linear % equation problem; part II is about the eigenvalue problem. % There are 40 procedures in part I and 43 in part II. %% % Here is a list of the procedures in Part II. A suffix 2 in the procedure % name indicates that it computes both eigenvalues and eigenvectors. % The "bak" procedures apply reduction transformations to eigenvectors. %% % Many of the procedures work with a reduced form, which is tridiagonal for % symmetric or Hermitian matrices and Hessenberg (upper triangular plus % one subdiagonal) for nonsymmetric matrices., % Since Algol does not have a complex number data type, the complex % arrays are represented by pairs of real arrays. %% Symmetric matrices % % % Reduction to tridiagonal % tred1, tred2, tred3, trbak1, trbak3 Orthogonal tridiagonalization. % Band % bandrd Tridiagonalization. % symray Eigenvectors. % bqr One eigenvalue. % Tridiagonal % imtql1,imtql2 All eigenvalues and vectors, implicit QR. % tql1, tql2 All eigenvalues and vectors, explicit QR. % ratqr Few eigenvalues, rational QR. % bisect Few eigenvalues, bisection. % tristurm Few eigenvalues and vectors. % Few eigenvalues % ritzit Simultaneous iteration. % Jacobi method % jacobi Jacobi method. % Generalized problem, Ax = \lambda Bx % reduc1, reduc2, rebaka, rebakb Symmetric A, positive definite B. % %% Nonsymmetric matrices % % % Reduction to Hessenberg % balance, balbak Balance (scaling) % dirhes, dirbak, dirtrans Elementary, accumulated innerprod. % elmhes, elmbak, elmtrans Elementary. % orthes, ortbak, ortrans Orthogonal. % Band % unsray Eigenvectors. % Hessenberg % hqr, hqr2 All eigenvalues and vectors, implicit QR. % invit Few eigenvectors, inverse iteration. % Norm reducing % eigen Eigenvalues. % %% Complex matrices % % % comeig Norm reducing Jacobi. % comhes, combak Reduce to Hessenberg form. % comlr, comlr2 Complex LR algorithm. % cxinvit Inverse iteration. % %% Preferred paths % The preferred path for finding all the eigenvalues of a real, symmetric % matrix is _tred1_ followed by _imtql1_. % The preferred path for finding all the eigenvalues and eigenvectors % of a real, symmetric matrix is _tred2_ followed by _imtql2_. % % The preferred path for finding all the eigenvalues of a real, nonsymmetric % matrix is _balanc_, _elmhes_, and finally _hqr_. % The preferred path for finding all the eigenvalues and eigenvectors % of a real, nonsymmetric matrix is _balanc_, _elmhes_, _elmtrans_, _hqr2_, % and finally _balbak_. %% QR vs. QL % "QR" and "QL" are right- and left-handed, or forward and backward, % versions of the same algorithm. The algorithm is usually described in % terms of factoring a matrix into an orthogonal factor, Q, and an upper % or right triangular factor, R. This leads to QR algorithms. But for % reasons having to do with graded matrices and terminating a loop at |1| % rather than |n-1|, the authors of the Handbook decided to use left % triangular and QL algorithms. %% Historical note % When the papers from _Numerische Mathematik_ were collected to form the % 1971 _Handbook for Automatic Computation, Volume II, Linear Algebra_, % almost all of them where reprinted without change. But, despite what % its footnote says, Contribution II/4, _The Implicit QL Algorithm_, % never appeared in the journal. The paper is the merger of a half-page % paper by % and earlier contributions by R.S. Martin and Wilkinson. % Dubrulle was able to reduce the operation count in the inner loop. %% % The authors of Contribution II/4 of the Handbook are listed as % A. Dubrulle, R.S.Martin, and J.H.Wilkinson, although the three of them % never actually worked together. % Proper credit is given, but I'm afraid that an interesting little bit % of history has been lost. % % Dubrulle's version of the implicit tridiagonal QR algorithm continues to % be important today. In future posts I will describe how the Handbook % led to EISPACK, LINPACK and LAPACK. % In LAPACK the _imtql1_ and _imtql2_ functions are combined into one % subroutine named % % The code for the inner loop is very similar to Austin's note. % % Years after making this contribution, Austin returned to grad school % and was one of my Ph.D. students at the University of New Mexico. % His thesis was about the distribution of the singular value of the % matrices derived from photographs. ##### SOURCE END ##### 26cefaedad044f33a20d375f994408b9 -->

          Leslie Fox

          latest Blogs - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 22:30

          Leslie Fox (1918-1992) is a British numerical analyst who was a contemporary of three men who played such an important role in my education and early professional life, John Todd, George Forsythe, and Jim Wilkinson. Although I saw less of Fox than I did of the others, he was still an important influence in my life.

          ContentsNPL

          The National Physical Laboratory, in Teddington, England, just west of London, is the British equivalent of the U.S. agency that was originally called the National Bureau of Standards and is now known as the National Institute of Science and Technology. Fox worked at NPL from 1945 until 1956. Wilkinson worked there his entire professional life. Despite the fact that Fox was from Oxford and Wilkinson was from Cambridge, they became close friends.

          In the first few years after World War II, both NPL and NBS sponsored the development of first generation stored program electronic computers. An initial design for the NPL machine, the Automatic Computing Engine, was proposed by Alan Turing. But the design was based in part on secret work that Turing had done during the War for breaking German military codes. The management of NPL at the time was not allowed access to Turing's secret work and judged the machine to be impractical with current technology. Disillusioned, Turing left NPL and went to the University of Manchester, where they were also building a computer.

          It fell to one of Turing's colleagues, Jim Wilkinson, to take over the project and build a simplified version of the ACE, the Pilot Ace. Wilkinson went on to become the world's leading authority on matrix computation. He was my inspiration and friend. His work provided the mathematical basis for the first MATLAB. Fox was less involved in the hardware development, but he was certainly an early user of the Pilot Ace.

          NBS

          Meanwhile in U.S., NBS was sponsoring the development of two early machines, one at its headquarters in Maryland, the Standards Eastern Automatic Computer, or SEAC, and one in southern California, at UCLA, the Standards Western Automatic Computer, or SWAC.

          NBS also established a research group at UCLA, the Institute for Numerical Analysis, or INA, to contribute to the work on the SWAC. Two members of the INA were John Todd, who a few years later as a faculty member at Caltech, would introduce me to numerical analysis and computing, and George Forsythe, who would go on to establish the Computer Science Department at Stanford and also be my Ph.D. thesis advisor.

          The groups at NPL in England and INA in California were in close contact with each other and often exchanged visits. As a result, the four men -- Fox, Wilkinson, Todd, and Forsythe -- became friends and colleagues and leading figures in the budding field that today would be called computational science.

          Modern Computing Methods

          When I took my first numerical analysis course from Todd at Caltech in 1959, we didn't have a regular textbook. There weren't many to choose from. Todd was in the process of writing what would become his Survey of Numerical Analysis. He passed out purple dittoed copies of an early draft of the book. (Today, Amazon has 19 used copies available for $8.23 with free shipping.)

          In lieu of a formal textbook, Todd also referred to this 130-page paper bound pamphlet. Its title says "Modern", but it was first published 60 years ago, in 1957. Here is a link to the hardcover second addition, Modern Computing Methods. (Amazon has 3 used copies available for $7.21, plus $3.99 shipping.)

          The publisher of the first edition is listed as the picturesque Her Majesty's Stationery Office. But there are no authors listed. The source is just the National Physical Laboratory. For many years I believed the authors were Fox and Wilkinson. Now, while writing this post, I have come across this review by Charles Saltzer in SIAM Review. The authors are revealed to be "E. T. Goodwin et al". Goodwin was another member of the NPL group. So, I suspect that Fox and Wilkinson were that " et al ".

          Oxford

          Fox resigned from NPL in 1956 and, after a year in the U.S. visiting U. C. Berkeley, joined the faculty at his old school, Oxford. He remained there the rest of his life. He established the Oxford Computing Laboratory. In 1963 he was appointed Professor of Numerical Analysis and Fellow of Balliol College. (My good friend Nick Trefethen now holds both of those appointments.)

          Fox was a prolific author. The bibliography in Leslie Fox booklet lists eight books. He was also a popular professor. The same booklet lists 18 D. Phil. students that he supervised and 71 D. Phil. students where he a member of the committee.

          NAG

          The Numerical Algorithms Group is a British company, founded in 1970 and with headquarters in Oxford, which markets mathematical software, consulting, and related services. Fox helped the company get started and served on its Board of Directors for many years.

          Householder VIII

          Fox hosted the eighth Householder Symposium at Oxford in 1981. Here is the group photo. Fox is in the center, in the brown suit. (I am in the second row, second from left, in the blue shirt.)

          Fox Prize

          The Leslie Fox Prize for Numerical Analysis is awarded every two years by the IMA, the British Institute of Mathematics. The prize honors "young numerical analysts worldwide", that is anyone who is less than 31 years old. One or two first prize winners and usually several second prize winners are announced at symposia in the UK in June of odd numbered years. Eighteen meetings and prize announcements have been held since the award was established in 1985. The 2017 call for papers is IMA Leslie Fox Prize.

          The Prize Winners for 2017 were announced in a meeting in Glasgow on June 26. The first prize was awarded to Nicole Spillain of Ecole Polytechnique. Her winning paper was An Adaptive Multipreconditioned Conjugate Gradient Algorithm.

          Blue Plaque

          Wikipedia explains that "a blue plaque is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location and a famous person or event, serving as a historical marker." In June, two blue plaques were unveiled in the Dewsbury Railroad Station, in West Yorkshire, about 40 miles west of Manchester. (Google maps tells me that today trains to Manchester leave every half hour and usually can make the trip in 40 minites.)

          Photo credit: Huddersfield Daily Examiner

          The plaques honor two computer scientists, Leslie Fox and Tom Kilburn. Here is a local newspaper story covering the unveiling. Huddersfield Daily Examiner. It turns out the two were school mates in the local grammar school.

          Tom Kilburn worked with Freddie Williams at the University of Manchester to develop the Williams-Kilburn Tube, an early random access memory employing the static charge left by a grid of dots on a cathode ray tube. The scheme provided fast access time, but required constant tuning.

          Kilburn and Williams needed a stored program digital computer to test their storage device. So they built a relatively simple machine that came to be known as "Manchester Baby". One day in June, 1948, on the train from Dewsbury to Manchester, Kilburn wrote a program to find the prime factors of an integer. The code was probably only a few dozen machine instructions. When the team got the machine in shape to actually run the program it worked correctly the first time. This was the world's first working computer program, and first instance of mathematical software.

          Kilburn became the Professor of Computer Science at Manchester about the same time as Fox became the Professor of Numerical Analysis at Oxford.

          Further Reading

          Two articles about Leslie Fox are available on the Web at Wikipedia and at the MacTutor History of Mathematics Archive.

          The booklet prepared by Oxford for his memorial service is available at Leslie Fox booklet.

          \n'); d.write(code_string); // Add copyright line at the bottom if specified. if (copyright.length > 0) { d.writeln(''); d.writeln('%%'); if (copyright.length > 0) { d.writeln('% _' + copyright + '_'); } } d.write('\n'); d.title = title + ' (MATLAB code)'; d.close(); } -->


          Get the MATLAB code (requires JavaScript)

          Published with MATLAB® R2017a

          , % , and % . % Although I saw less of Fox than I did of the others, he was still % an important influence in my life. % % <> %% NPL % The National Physical Laboratory, in Teddington, England, just west % of London, is the British equivalent of the U.S. agency that was % originally called the National Bureau of Standards and is now known as % the National Institute of Science and Technology. Fox worked at % NPL from 1945 until 1956. Wilkinson worked there his entire % professional life. Despite the fact that Fox was from Oxford and % Wilkinson was from Cambridge, they became close friends. %% % In the first few years after World War II, both NPL and NBS sponsored % the development of first generation stored program electronic computers. % An initial design for the NPL machine, the % , was proposed by Alan Turing. But the % design was based in part on secret work that Turing had done during the % War for breaking German military codes. The management of NPL at % the time was not allowed access to Turing's secret work and judged the % machine to be impractical with current technology. Disillusioned, Turing % left NPL and went to the University of Manchester, where they were also % building a computer. %% % It fell to one of Turing's colleagues, Jim Wilkinson, to take over the % project and build a simplified version of the ACE, the % . Wilkinson went % on to become the world's leading authority on matrix computation. % He was my inspiration and friend. His work provided the mathematical % basis for the first MATLAB. Fox was less involved in the hardware % development, but he was certainly an early user of the Pilot Ace. %% NBS % Meanwhile in U.S., NBS was sponsoring the development of two early % machines, one at its headquarters in Maryland, the Standards Eastern % Automatic Computer, or % , % and one in southern California, at UCLA, the Standards Western % Automatic Computer, or % . %% % NBS also established a research group at UCLA, the Institute for % Numerical Analysis, or % , to contribute to the work on the SWAC. % Two members of the INA were John Todd, who a few years later as a % faculty member at Caltech, would introduce me to numerical analysis % and computing, and George Forsythe, who would go on to establish % the Computer Science Department at Stanford and also be my Ph.D. thesis % advisor. %% % The groups at NPL in England and INA in California were in close % contact with each other and often exchanged visits. As a result, the % four men REPLACE_WITH_DASH_DASH Fox, Wilkinson, Todd, and Forsythe REPLACE_WITH_DASH_DASH became friends and % colleagues and leading figures in the budding field that today would % be called computational science. %% Modern Computing Methods % When I took my first numerical analysis course from Todd at Caltech % in 1959, we didn't have a regular textbook. There weren't many to % choose from. Todd was in the process of writing what would become his % . He passed out purple dittoed copies of % an early draft of the book. (Today, Amazon has 19 used copies available % for $8.23 with free shipping.) %% % In lieu of a formal textbook, Todd also referred to this 130-page % paper bound pamphlet. Its title says "Modern", but it was first % published 60 years ago, in 1957. % Here is a link to the hardcover second addition, % . (Amazon has 3 used copies available for % $7.21, plus $3.99 shipping.) % % <> %% % The publisher of the first edition is listed as the picturesque % _Her Majesty's Stationery Office_. But there are no authors listed. % The source is just the National Physical Laboratory. For many years % I believed the authors were Fox and Wilkinson. Now, while writing this % post, I have come across % by % Charles Saltzer in _SIAM Review_. The authors are revealed to be % "E. T. Goodwin _et al_". Goodwin was another member of the NPL group. % So, I suspect that Fox and Wilkinson were that " _et al_ ". %% Oxford % Fox resigned from NPL in 1956 and, after a year in the U.S. visiting % U. C. Berkeley, joined the faculty at his old school, Oxford. % He remained there the rest of his life. He established the % Oxford Computing Laboratory. In 1963 he was appointed Professor of % Numerical Analysis and Fellow of Balliol College. (My good friend % Nick Trefethen now holds both of those appointments.) %% % Fox was a prolific author. The bibliography in % lists eight books. % He was also a popular professor. The same booklet lists 18 D. Phil. % students that he supervised and 71 D. Phil. students where he a % member of the committee. %% NAG % The is a British % company, founded in 1970 and with headquarters in Oxford, which markets % mathematical software, consulting, and related services. Fox helped % the company get started and served on its Board of Directors for many % years. %% Householder VIII % Fox hosted the eighth Householder Symposium at Oxford in 1981. % Here is the group photo. Fox is in the center, in the brown suit. % (I am in the second row, second from left, in the blue shirt.) % % <> % %% Fox Prize % The % is awarded every two years % by the IMA, the British Institute of Mathematics. The prize honors % "young numerical analysts worldwide", that is anyone who is less than % 31 years old. One or two first prize winners and usually several second % prize winners are announced at symposia in the UK in June of odd numbered % years. Eighteen meetings and prize announcements have been held since % the award was established in 1985. The 2017 call for papers is % . %% % The were announced in a meeting in Glasgow % on June 26. The first prize was awarded to % of Ecole Polytechnique. % Her winning paper was % . %% Blue Plaque % Wikipedia explains that "a is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the % United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location % and a famous person or event, serving as a historical marker." % In June, two blue plaques were unveiled in the Dewsbury Railroad % Station, in West Yorkshire, about 40 miles west of Manchester. % (Google maps tells me that today trains to Manchester leave every half % hour and usually can make the trip in 40 minites.) % % <> % % Photo credit: Huddersfield Daily Examiner %% % The plaques honor two computer scientists, Leslie Fox and Tom Kilburn. % Here is a local newspaper story covering the unveiling. % . It turns out the two were school mates in % the local grammar school. %% % worked with % Freddie Williams at the University of Manchester to develop the % , % an early random access memory employing the static charge left by % a grid of dots on a cathode ray tube. The scheme provided fast access % time, but required constant tuning. % % Kilburn and Williams needed a stored program digital computer to test % their storage device. So they built a relatively simple machine that % came to be known as % . % One day in June, 1948, on the train from Dewsbury to Manchester, % Kilburn wrote a program to find the prime factors of an integer. % The code was probably only a few dozen machine instructions. % When the team got the machine in shape to actually run the program % it worked correctly the first time. This was the world's first working % computer program, and first instance of mathematical software. % % Kilburn became the Professor of Computer Science at Manchester about % the same time as Fox became the Professor of Numerical Analysis at % Oxford. %% Further Reading % Two articles about Leslie Fox are available on the Web at % and at the % . % % The booklet prepared by Oxford for his memorial service is available at % . ##### SOURCE END ##### ed1184c94b7b4a1da68df57a87340027 -->

          SEO Foundations Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:48

          Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of affecting the online visibility of a website or a web page in a web search engine's unpaid results—often referred to as "natural", "organic", or "earned" results. In general, the earlier (or higher ranked on the search results page), and more frequently a website appears in the search results list, the more visitors it will receive from the search engine's users; these visitors can then be converted into customers. SEO may target different kinds of search, including image search, video search, academic search, news search, and industry-specific vertical search engines. SEO differs from local search engine optimization in that the latter is focused on optimizing a business' online presence so that its web pages will be displayed by search engines when a user enters a local search for its products or services. The former instead is more focused on national or international searches.

          Topic Included: 

          Increase your website's visibility on search engines like Google and Bing and attract the right kind of traffic to the right pages on your site. Learn about search engine optimization including how to read a results page, find your ranking, and see how rankings affect businesses large and small. Discover how to implement foundational optimization strategies and techniques, including how to conduct keyword research, build inbound links, optimize your pages and content, measure your successes and progress, and plan for a long-term SEO strategy. Additionally, learn specific SEO tips for ecommerce, local search, and mobile audiences to expand your reach.

          Topics include:

          • What is SEO?
          • Understanding how search engines index content
          • Researching keywords
          • Using SEO tools
          • Optimizing pages for keywords
          • Optimizing code and site structure
          • Building links to your content
          • Optimizing nontext components of a webpage
          • Analyzing content quality
          • Defining your audience, topics, angle, and style
          • Promoting your content via social media
          • Measuring SEO effectiveness
          • Setting up Google+ Local
          • Optimizing ecommerce sites for search
          • Configuring sites for mobile

          Analyzing Your Website to Improve SEO Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:46
          Topic Included: 

          In this course, search engine optimization (SEO) expert Peter Kent walks step-by-step through the process of reviewing the content and markup of an existing web site to improve its ranking in search engine results. This course offers a consultant's take on how to analyze each component—from keywords to content to code—and determine what improvements are necessary to become more visible to search engines like Yahoo!, Bing, and Google. 

          This course was updated on 10/12/2012.Topics include:

          • Understanding why indexing is important
          • Using the Google AdWords Keyword Tool
          • Dealing with frames, iframes, and popups
          • Working with SEO-friendly URLs
          • Using meta tags
          • Clearing source code clutter
          • Building links within the site
          • Working with Google+
          • Reviewing page content
          • Building and submitting an HTML and XML sitemap
          • Garnering links outside the site

          Windows 10 Essential Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:42

          Please be aware that there was a significant update to Windows in August 2016, called the Anniversary Update. If you are using Windows after running the Anniversary Update, you should switch over to a different course, Windows 10 Anniversary Update Essential Training.

          Learn all the essential features of Windows 10. This comprehensive course covers everything you need to know to install Windows, customize it to your liking, and start working with files and applications. Author Nick Brazzi shows how to manage folders, use Cortana to search and navigate, browse the web with the new Microsoft Edge browser, and work with Mail, Calendars, and People (aka contacts).

          Plus, learn about sharing via a home network, multiuser configurations, security and privacy, and troubleshooting Windows.

          Topics include:

          • Installing or upgrading to Windows 10
          • Connecting to the Internet
          • Launching, quitting, and managing applications
          • Creating, copying, moving, and renaming files and folders
          • Zipping and unzipping files
          • Using Cortana to search
          • Browsing the web with Edge
          • Sending email
          • Installing new apps
          • Sharing files over home networks
          • Backing up and restoring files
          • Configuring Windows updates
          • Using Windows Defender

          Twitter Essential Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:40

          Twitter is an online news and social networking service where users post and interact with messages, called "tweets." These messages were originally restricted to 140 characters, but on November 7, 2017, the limit was doubled to 280 characters for all languages except Japanese, Korean and Chinese. Registered users can post tweets, but those who are unregistered can only read them. Users access Twitter through its website interface, SMS or a mobile device app. Twitter, Inc. is based in San Francisco, California, United States, and has more than 25 offices around the world.

          Topic Included: 

          Learning how to speak the language of the "Twitterverse" can help you tap into a worldwide conversation and express—in 140 characters or less—your own ideas and opinions. In this course, learn the ins and outs of Twitter, one of the world's most prominent social media platforms. Explore the conventions and lingo of the microblogging social network, including tweets, retweets, direct messages, follows, and mentions. Discover how to create an account, write tweets, include images and links in your tweets, find people you know or who have shared interests, download and install the Twitter app on a mobile device, and more.Topics include:

          • Understanding Twitter and microblogging
          • Finding friends by searching your contacts
          • Creating and viewing your Twitter profile
          • Composing a tweet
          • Creating a Twitter poll
          • Using hashtags
          • Deleting, pinning, and sharing tweets
          • Navigating an individual tweet
          • Interacting with tweets and users
          • Exploring Twitter settings
          • Creating a Twitter Moment
          • Creating lists of Twitter users

          SQL Essential Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:39

          SQL (Structured Query Language) is a domain-specific language used in programming and designed for managing data held in a relational database management system (RDBMS), or for stream processing in a relational data stream management system (RDSMS). In comparison to older read/write APIs like ISAM or VSAM, SQL offers two main advantages: first, it introduced the concept of accessing many records with one single command; and second, it eliminates the need to specify how to reach a record, e.g. with or without an index.

          Originally based upon relational algebra and tuple relational calculus, SQL consists of a data definition language, data manipulation language, and data control language. The scope of SQL includes data insert, query, update and delete, schema creation and modification, and data access control. Although SQL is often described as, and to a great extent is, a declarative language (4GL), it also includes procedural elements.

          SQL was one of the first commercial languages for Edgar F. Codd's relational model, as described in his influential 1970 paper, "A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks". Despite not entirely adhering to the relational model as described by Codd, it became the most widely used database language.

          SQL became a standard of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) in 1986, and of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 1987. Since then, the standard has been revised to include a larger set of features. Despite the existence of such standards, most SQL code is not completely portable among different database systems without adjustments.

          Topic Included: 

          Whatever a database is being used for—websites, bookkeeping, sales and inventory, or even the lowly to-do list—it's still all about the data. Completely updated for 2014, SQL Essential Training is designed to help users understand the most common language for database wrangling, SQL. Beginning with a quick start introduction for those who want to start working with data immediately, instructor Bill Weinman teaches all the major features of SQL: creating tables; defining relationships; manipulating strings, numbers, and dates; using triggers to automate actions; and working with subselects and views. He offers a solid working knowledge of the language, and shows how to retrieve and manage data efficiently. The final chapter includes a real-world example of building a simple CRUD (Create, Read, Update, and Delete) application using SQL.Topics include:

          • Understanding SQL terminology and syntax
          • Creating new tables and records
          • Inserting and updating data
          • Writing basic SQL queries
          • Sorting and filtering
          • Accessing related tables with JOIN
          • Working with strings
          • Finding the numeric type of a value
          • Using aggregate functions and transactions
          • Updating a table with triggers
          • Creating views

          Muse Essential Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:38

          Adobe Muse is a website builder that allows designers to create fixed, fluid, and adaptive websites without having to write any code. Muse generates static websites giving users the freedom to host their sites with any hosting provider. Users can add more advanced functionality such as blogging and eCommerce to their website with plugins created by third-party developers. This application is available through Adobe's Creative Cloud subscription.

          Adobe Muse themes are created inside Adobe Muse and shared as a .muse file. Themes do not require any configuration or setup to get running. Since Adobe Muse generates static HTML files, the files can be exported to the browser for testing without needing to connect to a server or webhost. Because of its static nature, however, themes cannot be applied to existing content and content cannot be imported into a theme. Since themes are created inside Adobe Muse, themes do not require knowledge of any code. Free starter designs are offered on Adobe Muse. Themes can be viewed via a built in 'Preview' option that allows users to preview their website in the application. Users can also temporarily host their website in Business Catalyst for free as part of the Creative Cloud subscription.

          Topic Included: 

          Muse is the leading no-code web design tool, and our Essential Training course covers everything you need to know to build your own unique, expressive websites with its visual, intuitive toolset. Adobe product manager Dani Beaumont walks through the major Muse features and introduces productivity tips for implementing your own websites quickly. Learn how to plan and design a site, place and style images and text, configure slideshows and contact forms, and publish and export your new Muse site. Along the way, you'll discover how to use features like master pages, breakpoints, and scroll effects to build more responsive sites—without any code.

          Topics include:

          • Creating a site plan
          • Working with master pages
          • Adding elements from CC Libraries to master pages
          • Adding web fonts
          • Creating and overriding text styles
          • Placing images
          • Working with image blocks and hyperlinks
          • Configuring slideshows
          • Adding new sections
          • Creating a contact form
          • Adding breakpoints
          • Creating a responsive master page
          • Publishing and exporting your Muse site

          Drupal 7 Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:37

          Drupal a free and open source content-management framework written in PHP and distributed under the GNU General Public License. Drupal provides a back-end framework for at least 2.3% of all web sites worldwide – ranging from personal blogs to corporate, political, and government sites. Systems also use Drupal for knowledge management and for business collaboration.

          As of November 2017, the Drupal community is composed of more than 1.3 million members, including 109,000 users actively contributing, resulting in more than 39,000 free modules that extend and customize Drupal functionality, over 2,500 free themes that change the look and feel of Drupal, and at least 1,180 free distributions that allow users to quickly and easily set up a complex, use-specific Drupal in fewer steps.

          The standard release of Drupal, known as Drupal core, contains basic features common to content-management systems. These include user account registration and maintenance, menu management, RSS feeds, taxonomy, page layout customization, and system administration. The Drupal core installation can serve as a simple Web site, a single- or multi-user blog, an Internet forum, or a community Web site providing for user-generated content.

          Topic Included: 

          Drupal 7 Essential Training shows how to get the most out of Drupal, the content management system (CMS) that powers over a quarter million web sites. The course demonstrates how to download and install Drupal, add content and graphics to a site, change layout and design elements, control visitor interactions, and expand the site's capabilities beyond what's available in Drupal core. Discussion of established best practices in each step to ensure that a site remains streamlined, secure, and up-to-date. Exercise files are included with the course.Topics include:

          • Comparing Drupal with other content management systems
          • Understanding nodes
          • Creating basic content
          • Adding blogs, discussions groups, and polls
          • Subscribing to RSS feeds
          • Creating new content types
          • Managing users, roles, and permissions
          • Creating and modifying block regions
          • Adding menus
          • Extending site capabilities with modules

          Responsive Single-Page Design with Sass Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:36

          A single-page application (SPA) is a web application or web site that interacts with the user by dynamically rewriting the current page rather than loading entire new pages from a server. This approach avoids interruption of the user experience between successive pages, making the application behave more like a desktop application. In an SPA, either all necessary code – HTML, JavaScript, and CSS – is retrieved with a single page load, or the appropriate resources are dynamically loaded and added to the page as necessary, usually in response to user actions. The page does not reload at any point in the process, nor does control transfer to another page, although the location hash or the HTML5 History API can be used to provide the perception and navigability of separate logical pages in the application. Interaction with the single page application often involves dynamic communication with the web server behind the scenes.

          Sass (syntactically awesome stylesheets) is a style sheet language initially designed by Hampton Catlin and developed by Natalie Weizenbaum. After its initial versions, Weizenbaum and Chris Eppstein continued to extend Sass with SassScript, a simple scripting language used in Sass files.

          Sass is a scripting language that is interpreted or compiled into Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). SassScript is the scripting language itself. Sass consists of two syntaxes. The original syntax, called "the indented syntax", uses a syntax similar to Haml. It uses indentation to separate code blocks and newline characters to separate rules. The newer syntax, "SCSS", uses block formatting like that of CSS. It uses braces to denote code blocks and semicolons to separate lines within a block. The indented syntax and SCSS files are traditionally given the extensions .sass and .scss, respectively.

          CSS3 consists of a series of selectors and pseudo-selectors that group

          Topic Included: 

          Learn how to build dynamic, responsive single-page designs with HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. The website featured in this course combines docking navigation, columns that adjust without cluttering your site layout or HTML markup, and animated scrolling effects that respond to user direction. Author Ray Villalobos shows you how to build it. He starts with a lean, easy-to-read template, and then explains how to add the features that make single-page designs so great, with these four frameworks:

          • Compass, whose Sass mixins help you leverage CSS3 features like Flexbox
          • Susy 2, the framework that "subtracts" the math from responsive grid design
          • ScrollMagic, for adding "magical" scroll effects
          • Breakpoint, which makes writing media queries in Sass a snap

          But this course isn't just about the tools. It's a realistic project that epitomizes many of the design challenges website developers face in the real world. Start watching now and learn how to use HTML, jQuery, and CSS to build your own dynamic, deeply responsive designs.

          Topics include:

          • Analyzing the project before you begin
          • Creating basic styles
          • Building your own Sass mixins
          • Coding the navigation
          • Making the navigation responsive, with grids
          • Using a split layout
          • Creating tween animations
          • Controlling scenes with scrolling

          Responsive Web Design Training Classes

          websitedeveloper - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 19:34

          Responsive web design (RWD) is an approach to web design which makes web pages render well on a variety of devices and window or screen sizes. Recent work also considers the viewer proximity as part of the viewing context as an extension for RWD. Content, design and performance are necessary across all devices to ensure usability and satisfaction.

          A site designed with RWD adapts the layout to the viewing environment by using fluid, proportion-based grids, flexible images, and CSS3 media queries, an extension of the @media rule, in the following ways:

          The fluid grid concept calls for page element sizing to be in relative units like percentages, rather than absolute units like pixels or points.
          Flexible images are also sized in relative units, so as to prevent them from displaying outside their containing element.
          Media queries allow the page to use different CSS style rules based on characteristics of the device the site is being displayed on, most commonly the width of the browser.
          Responsive web design has become more important as the amount of mobile traffic now accounts for more than half of total internet traffic. Therefore, Google announced Mobilegeddon in 2015, and started to boost the ratings of sites that are mobile friendly if the search was made from a mobile device. Responsive web design is an example of user interface plasticity.

          Topic Included: 

          Discover how to use responsive web design to make your site more readable and efficient—on any device. Chris Converse shares his own specialized techniques for combining HTML and CSS into a web layout that can adapt to different screen sizes and orientations. The course takes the site from start to finish, from setting up the HTML page and containers to styling established elements for small, medium, and large screens. Along the way, Chris shows how to reposition the nav bar for better viewing on mobile devices, create animated transitions, and turn bulleted lists into interactive menus with full touch support. Plus, learn how to use CSS pseudo-elements and adapt layouts for print to save ink and paper.

          The exercise files for this course are free to all members. Download them and start creating your own responsive websites today.Topics include:

          • Planning your layout
          • Creating HTML containers, content, and links
          • Creating and styling the layout with CSS
          • Creating a menu system
          • Styling headings, body text, and footers
          • Styling and repositioning navigation links
          • Swapping high-resolution graphics for Retina displays
          • Making sure content is printable

          Pages